Airline Company JetStar Wants You To Stay Home For Chinese New Year

Well played, Jetstar… well played.

Jetstar’s campaign for Chinese New Year is a reverse of its business model – but adds kudos to their brand image. To welcome the Year of the Rooster, JetStar wants people to stay home to celebrate the festivities with your loved ones.

The campaign is in response to the growing number of younger generation Singaporeans who are increasingly taking the opportunity to travel during the holiday season, despite it being the one time of the year families gather for reunions. So, Jetstar is taking a stand – put family first and stay home.

Social experiments like these may have been done before, but the real kicker is how Jetstar puts their money where their mouth is: For passengers who have booked flights departing Singapore on 27 and 28 January, and are now keen to stay home to enjoy get-togethers with family, Jetstar will move their  flights to a later date, for FREE.

Find out more about the campaign here.

The Priest & Imam From That Amazon Ad Are Now Actual Friends

An ad for Amazon Prime making its rounds over social media features the friendship between priest and an imam. If you haven’t watched the spot, you should… essentially, they both discover they share the same problem and – through Amazon – they help each other out.

It’s a very heartwarming trope and especially timely during these times (and season).

My faith in humanity was restored after I read this story in Relevant Magazine that reveals the actual priest and imam from the commercial met for the first time on the set of the commercial and have since become close friends.

See the interview by Al Jazeera below:

 

Can Video Games Be A Spiritual Experience? Short Film “Player Two” Answers

When I came across this video on social media, it hit me right in my geeky gamer feels!

This short film, called “Player Two“, was ostensibly based on a true story.

In response to a YouTube video titled “Can Video Games Be a Spiritual Experience?”, one commenter shared the story of how he had lost his father at a young age and reconnected with his ghost via a shared video game.

Here’s the video:

As a marketer and corporate communicator, I cannot help but note that this inadvertently serves as a great ad to the Microsoft Xbox. It’s a powerful, emotional story that does a great job humanizing the brand, video gaming, as well as the technology. Not a bad achievement in just under 2 minutes!

Now, Adweek has published an interview with John Wikstrom – the filmmaker behind “Player Two”. It’s interesting to note that Microsoft – the owner of Xbox – had nothing to do with the video.

Read the full Adweek story here: Here’s the Story Behind the Moving Xbox Video That Microsoft Had No Hand in Creating.

Shell We Move? – Suumo

Image Credit: Suumo

This was making its rounds on social media – clearly, as a testament to the viral nature of project.

Suumo is the biggest real estate information agent in Japan. Suumo was looking to build brand leadership when its agency HAKUHODO Kettle Tokyo challenged the company to meet the needs of a very unusual customer – the hermit crab.

The resulting initiative was called, “Shell We Move?

The initiative was a collaborative between Suumo and Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology to develop the perfect house for hermit crabs; especially since suitable seashells for hermit crab use were dwindling in Japan due to environmental degradation. The resulting solution was not only effective for the brand (increased purchase intention for the brand to 120%), it was also a useful and impactful, environmentally-friendly solution.

The alignment to the brand proposition was perfect – hermit crabs are famous for being the “masters of living,” who keep seeking the comfortable houses throughout their entire lives. Suumo was then poised to provide new comfortable houses for some of the most challenging customers in the world – and even turn them into unwitting brand advocates.

A short version of the case study (in English) can be viewed here:

A more comprehensive video case study (in Japanese, with English subtitles) is available here:

 

The Shell Eco-Marathon Asia 2016

Shell Eco Marathon 2016

I just came back from my favorite initiatives Shell has when it comes to engaging young people for the future of energy: The Shell Eco-Marathon. This is my second tour of duty for the Eco-Marathon – a unique race about going farther, not the fastest; using the least amount of fuel.

Held in Manila from 3-6 March 2016,  over 100 student teams from 16 countries across Asia, Middle East and Africa, in the Philippines, from 3-6 March 2016, at a specially designed street circuit on the city streets of Manila.

It’s a truly unique and inspiring event – I’ve met some of the most passionate and intelligent young people Asia has to offer when it comes to science, engineering, innovation and technology as they stretch the boundaries of fuel efficiency in a real world urban environment.

I was especially impressed by Team UiTM Eco-Planet, who emerged as champions of the UrbanConcept Hydrogen Fuel Cell category for the third time in a row. This year, they debuted a 3-D printed car that was assembled from 120 individually-printed parts, with each part taking approximately 10 hours to complete. They told me they only had a small, office-sized 3-D printer, which meant that they spent over 1,200 hours printing the individual parts which was later assembled together when they arrived in Manila!

The other fun bit about the Shell Eco-marathon is the Energy Zone, which allows visitors to experience activities and games that explore the future of energy, cities and sustainability.

 

It was a really fun time in the Philippines, this year. I was very proud of our Malaysian students who swept four top awards – congrats to Team UiTM Eco-Sprint and Team UiTM Eco-Planet from Universiti Teknologi MARA (“UiTM”) Shah Alam; Team Eco-Voyager from Universiti Malaya; and Team Eco-Chaser from Monash University Malaysia!

I often say, when it comes to marketing and communications, it’s better to do “more showing, less telling.” Hence, I really think this initiative showcases Shell at its very best – especially when it comes to inspiring hope and challenging minds about the future of energy and mobility. I look forward to the next iteration of the Eco-Marathon in the next year!

More pics available here.

More info: