Meet Mdm Teo, 70, UberEATS Singapore Delivery Partner

It was a real pleasure to help tell Mdm. Teo’s story. Her story, attitude, and personality is inspiring! It’s also a great testament to the company I work with – that we truly believe in providing flexible earning opportunities to as many people as possible!

“I applied to be a cashier at a convenience store and as a dishwasher, but none of (the companies) got back to me… It’s wonderful that (UberEATS) does not discriminate against the elderly… Some relatives and friends say I am so old, I should just enjoy the good life and look after my grandchildren. Others say they are old and useless and they can’t do this. But age doesn’t determine what you can or cannot do. Anything is possible if you want to do it. I am happy to do this for as long as possible because I feel younger and more alert when I move around.”

We broke the story through The Straits Times, who not only covered it extensively in print (with a cover mention!) and digital; they also did a video story about her which – to say the least – is currently going rather viral right now. As of this writing, the Facebook video has, in 2 days, achieved:

  • 455,000+ Views
  • 10,000+ Reactions
  • 5,800 Shares
  • 780 Comments – majority of which are positive!

We then followed up with a story on Mashable – which was noticed by CEO Travis Kalanick who shared it on Facebook!

A huge word of thanks to Mdm. Teo who graciously made time for the media to speak with her!

I hope that I can be half as chic and healthy (note to self) as she is when I’m 70.

The Conversation Prism 2013 – Today’s Complex Social Media Landscape In One Infographic

I like Brian Solis and the work he does with personal branding and social media. I liked how he tried to map out the Twitterverse and I remember when seeing the previous iterations of his conversation prism. It was a great way to show people just how complex the social media landscape was and what marketers needed to prepare themselves for when they wanted to get “on board.” Of course, this isn’t about getting on board every single platform there is – it’s about realizing that the conversations that happen around our brands occur in a very, very complex and messy place. 🙂

This year’s Conversation Prism reflects just how much more complex and messy the landscape has become:

In fact, I appreciated how this Mashable article traced the development of the conversation prism over the years. In fact, the very first one shows just how much simpler the social media landscape was in 2008 (it’s kinda interesting to think of 5 years ago being “the good ol’ days”!):

While the 2008 chart looked like a flower, the latest one resembles a kaleidoscope. The latest Conversation Prism has four additional categories with at least six brands in each. The infographic also highlights how the social media ecosystem is constantly changing. Some brands like Xanga (remember this other blogging platform besides WordPress and Blogger?) have disappeared while others that weren’t around five years ago — like Path — are now among category leaders.

In the end, however, it’s really not about jumping on every single platform that exists. It’s primarily being very clear on your conversation strategy (remember: social media is primarily social first, media second) then deciding on the right mix of where to engage your audiences in that conversation (blending between where the conversations are currently most actively taking place as well as where the conversation will go next).

How To Avoid a Social Media Disaster (via Mashable)

I was writing about my terrible ordeal with the telemarketer for the iStrategy2010 conference (on Social Media, no less) [Part 1, Part 2, Part 3] when I stumbled upon this helpful article via Mashable: How to respond when Social Media attacks your brand?. Of course, prevention is much better than cure… so here’s another helpful article via Mashable: How to avoid a social media disaster. (I really love Mashable!)

For the PR and Communications professional, the impact of a crisis has been exponentially exacerbated by the power of social media. As I’ve said before, this is due to the powerful fact that social media is essentially a network, with implicit assumptions of trust and credibility (by network members), and a built-in capacity for rapid dissemination of news.

Now, anyone and everyone can now vent their dissatisfaction about your brand and, I assure you, they will have their own like-minded audiences (friends, relatives, total strangers) who are similarly equipped and empowered. If unmanaged, you will have an echo-chamber of negativity that will get out of hand.

Even so, any practitioner will understand that one can never fully “control” what customers and audiences say about one’s brand – especially on social media platforms. Most would also agree that it’s not something you want to do, since social media is essentially a social medium – i.e. you don’t own it, the community does. It’s exactly because of this freedom to comment, to voice opinions and to generally share information that results in the kind of customers you want – those who are engaged with your brand! These customers end up being that desired loyal fan base that spreads the word about your brand to their friends and family.

Still, there are a few steps that you can take to prevent or circumvent a negative PR crisis about your brand on social media networks online. Here’s what the Mashable article recommends:

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How to respond when Social Media attacks your brand? (via Mashable)

Just as I was writing about my terrible ordeal with the telemarketer for the iStrategy2010 conference (on Social Media, no less) [Part 1, Part 2, Part 3], I stumbled upon this helpful article via Mashable: How to respond when Social Media attacks your brand?

It’s a great article with real case studies of how three brands were attacked via Social Media and what they did to respond. Here are my key takeaways:

  1. Stop the attack before it escalates. It’s very easy to jump on to the “bashing bandwagon.” You must realise that social media is essentially a network, with implicit assumptions of trust and credibility (by network members), and a built-in capacity for rapid dissemination of news. Think of what that means when people start bashing your brand.
  2. Listen to your customer. Social media is social. You’re in a dialogue/discussion now. Gone are the days of monologues or one-way conversations. These days, the customer has the tools that empower them to be heard… so start listening for real!
  3. Have a plan. Crisis communications and issues management is no longer just about managing print and broadcast media. Now, anyone and everyone with Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn can spread the news. Make sure you have a plan that takes that into consideration.
  4. Monitor social media. Set up some capability to monitor social media channels. You’ll want to know what’s being said about you and where so that you can respond quickly.
  5. Engage! As I said, social media is social! To earn the right to be heard (and therefore respond to allegations), you must participate in the conversation!

4 Tips To Writing SEO-Friendly Blog Posts (via Mashable)

When you write blog posts, it’s not just about writing for human readers – you also have to consider how search engines seek out relevant results based on the key words you use in your blog post. Since most would-be readers use search engines to find blog posts, you need to make sure that Google ranks your site highly when those readers search for terms related to your business and the content you’re writing.

Here are four tips on how to write SEO-friendly blog posts courtesy of Mashable:

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