Building Reputation: Trust Deficit in the World of Fake News

With fellow panelists and moderator. Photo credit: PRCA Malaysia

Recently, I was invited to be a panelist to discuss Building Reputation: Trust Deficit in the World of Fake News.

Here are the notes I prepared for myself (with some elaboration, specifically for this blog):

Point 1: The marketplace of reputation is built on the currency of trust.

Reputation provides the shorthand of trust – and becomes the lens by which we view the brand/company. 

However, communication doesn’t occur in a vacuum – this is where the of the media becomes vital. However, there is much to be discussed regarding the role of media as The Fourth Estate.  Which leads to:

Point 2: Fake news is possible because it is possible to distrust the media.

So, in that vacuum, bad actors fill the void with misinformation.

Media plays a key role and it’s why I have a keen interest in the survivability of the media industry. My concern is that with increasing overheads and budgetary pressures, some are veering very close to pay to play models.

Point 3: So what are we doing about this?

  1. Building & Safeguarding our reputation and building trust has become far more important amidst the noise and fake news.
  2. We are also exploring models of becoming our own media channels – owned channels (I.e. newsrooms).

More pics here.

Stay classy – taking the higher road in brand & reputation building

stayclassyapple

When news reports of Samsung Note 7 devices exploding started landing, some competitor brands had a field day trying to troll Samsung.

This is, of course, nothing new in the highly competitive mobile devices industry. In fact, Samsung has been guilty of doing the same to its idol competitor.

Now, what did Apple do or say to Samsung?

Nothing.

That’s right – zip, zilch, zero… nada.

Apple said nothing; instead, it maintained the high road and didn’t kick its competitor while they were down (or attempt to take revenge for the many trolling incidences in the past). After all, the issue was a serious one – explosions are no small things and any injury to a consumer is one too many. What if a device had exploded in the hands of a child?

Then, I read today that an Apple iPhone 7 has “exploded”.

While investigations into the incident are ongoing, the news cycle has, well, exploded. Reading through the coverage, however, there isn’t much cynicism directed towards Apple (although, there’s plenty to go around in mobile devices sector especially in regards to one brand copying another).

Can you imagine how the news cycle and public backlash might be like if Apple had trolled Samsung during the exploding Note 7 fiasco, though?

Remember: Stay classy.

You never know when karma might come back to bite you in the ass.

Social Networking and Personal Branding

I know this is pretty much accepted as conventional wisdom, but I thought I’d put it down here anyway.

Social Networking – both offline and online – remains a vital tool in personal brand management.

As an example, I just found out enough about an incoming personnel both good and bad (unfortunately, it was mostly bad) – to have already formed my first impression. This means, the person will be coming in and, unknowingly, having to prove themselves already.

Is this good or bad? I don’t know – I only know that this is how things work.

It used to be what you know.

But then, it’s also who you know.

Now, you need to also think about who knows you… and what they know about you.

Hence, your personal brand: What you know < Whom you know < Who knows you < What they know about you.

Thoughts?