Interbrand’s Best Global Brands 2013

Interbrand hast just released their Best Global Brands 2013 survey results and, after 13 years, there is a new king of the hill: Apple.

The study, which looks into the value of corporate brands, noted that Apple is the first company to push Coca-Cola aside – which had been the top most valuable brand every year since the study first began in 2000. Interbrand assessed Apple at $98.3 billion while second place winner, Google came in with a brand value of $93.3 billion, well ahead of Coca-Cola’s $79.2 billion value.

I think it’s really interesting to note that 5 out of the top 10 brands are technology-related brands, followed by beverages (1), business services (1), diversified (1), restaurants (1), automotive (1). I believe it’s truly indicative of the increasing recognition of technology in global business and consumer consciousness.

Jez Frampton, Interbrand’s Global Chief Executive Officer stated, “Every so often, a company changes our lives—not just with its products, but with its ethos. This is why, following Coca-Cola’s 13-year run at the top of Best Global Brands, Apple now ranks #1.”

He continued, “Tim Cook has assembled a solid leadership team and has kept Steve Jobs’ vision intact – a vision that has allowed Apple to deliver on its promise of innovation time and time again.”

Interbrand bases its assessment on a combination of the company’s financial performance, its role influencing consumer choices, and how well the brand lets a company charge premium prices and deliver profits.

Click here for the full report in PDF.

Taking A Stand Against Online Bullying – 10th Annual APIRA International Conference 2013

This morning, I was invited to present the Malaysian findings of Microsoft Trustworthy Computing‘s Global Youth Online Behavior Study at the 10th Asia Pacific Internet Research Alliance (APIRA) International Conference held in Kuala Lumpur.

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This issue of cyberbullying – and the survey findings – have been close to my heart.

The survey findings touched a raw nerve in Malaysian society because of the rising trend of online abuse. Alarmingly, the survey revealed that 1-in-3 Malaysian children say they have been subjected to a range of online activities that some may consider to be online bullying. In fact, the Malaysian study findings eventually formed the basis of this cover story by The Star: “Virtual Punks“.

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It’s not just young, teenage fan girls who’re getting abused. Local YouTubers have spoken up regularly about Internet “trolls”, a term to describe people who persistently post negative comments online to provoke someone. It has become a wider part of Internet culture, and everyone from footballers and reality TV stars to the average Malaysian teenager is a potential target, largely thanks to the anonymity afforded by the Internet.

So, as a parent, it thus became my vested interest to follow this issue closely and to go beyond the statistics. This is a starkly real issue that needs to be addressed by the collective efforts of parents, educators, experts and corporate citizens like Microsoft.

Here are the slides I presented. I hope, like me, you will also be moved to action: